BOSTON REVIEW

Apr 22

[video]

Earth Day irony: our love of nature arose from industrialization -

Even as nineteenth-century Americans were cutting forests, damming rivers, and paving roads, leading thinkers were sanctifying nature. Environmental historian William Cronon writes, “Far from being the one place on earth that stands apart from humanity, [the wilderness] is quite profoundly a human creation”—in particular the creation of nineteenth-century romanticism. “Wilderness fulfills the old romantic project of secularizing Judeo-Christian values so as to make a new cathedral not in some petty human building but in … Nature itself.” That people “who regard themselves as agnostics or even atheists nonetheless express feelings tantamount to religious awe when in the presence of wilderness … testifies to the success of the romantic project.”

Apr 21

Paul Hockenos: Can Vladimir Putin Upend Democracy in Europe? -

National and international politics, economics, philosophy, ethics, literature, and more. http://bit.ly/1fRfwmu

National and international politics, economics, philosophy, ethics, literature, and more. http://bit.ly/1fRfwmu

Apr 20

Seems a bit harsh.

Seems a bit harsh.

from “Issue” by Michele Glazer

“We have arrived at what we dread: the
diminution of loved ones, livid

and unmistakable lapses, quick
angers that lap at, lick at

dread: dread

that is the one certain shore.”

Read the rest: http://ow.ly/vVYZa 

Is Suicide Ever Meaningful? -

Such acts, so difficult to comprehend, may seem at first sight unworthy of serious consideration. But rushing to this conclusion would be a mistake. It is not only that by dismissing acts of self-sacrifice as unintelligible we disavow a prevalent and influential human phenomenon.

Apr 19


Talking with Wayne Koestenbaum, like reading his diverse body of work, is thrilling. I went rock-climbing for the first time recently and though the analogy to Wayne’s writing might seem like a stretch, bear with me. Looking for a foothold—on a rock-face or in Wayne’s universe—it turns out, requires creativity, a different kind of seeking, a looking both deeply and askance at what appears at first to be straight surface. Both demand an unusual combination of trusted instinct and hard work. When it all comes together, there arises an intoxicating pleasure that masks the fact that you are intensely vulnerable, that you are hanging precariously over an abyss. It is serious stuff. Wayne’s work—his poems, his essays, his criticism—obliterates any vestigial divide we might hold on to between play and thought. It revels in and broadcasts the risks and joys (the risky joys and joyful risks) inherent in both.

Read the interview: http://bit.ly/1gHloji

Talking with Wayne Koestenbaum, like reading his diverse body of work, is thrilling. I went rock-climbing for the first time recently and though the analogy to Wayne’s writing might seem like a stretch, bear with me. Looking for a foothold—on a rock-face or in Wayne’s universe—it turns out, requires creativity, a different kind of seeking, a looking both deeply and askance at what appears at first to be straight surface. Both demand an unusual combination of trusted instinct and hard work. When it all comes together, there arises an intoxicating pleasure that masks the fact that you are intensely vulnerable, that you are hanging precariously over an abyss. It is serious stuff. Wayne’s work—his poems, his essays, his criticism—obliterates any vestigial divide we might hold on to between play and thought. It revels in and broadcasts the risks and joys (the risky joys and joyful risks) inherent in both.

Read the interview: http://bit.ly/1gHloji

“As many as half of the U.S. prison population suffers from mental illness. How can the system adapt?” — Jessica Pishko investigates: http://bit.ly/1jKDXqK